Tuesday Sep 02, 2014

Family Medicine for America's Health to Launch at Assembly

I am extremely excited that the launch of Family Medicine for America's Health is less than two months away; the official rollout will occur in October in Washington, D.C., at the 2014 AAFP Assembly. As president-elect of the AAFP, I want to personally invite you to be there for this big event. This is truly history in the making, placing family medicine at the center of health care delivery in our nation.

For those of you who are unable to attend the Assembly in person, stay tuned, because we are working on a plan to deliver this event to you through digital channels.

Here is our latest update on this important project.

Family Medicine for America's Health
Organizational Update No. 8
September 2014

The goal of the Family Medicine for America's Health initiative is to meet the needs of the American public by achieving the triple aim of better care, better outcomes and lower costs. This initiative includes two integrated elements: a communications program aimed at consumers, policymakers, payers and the medical community and a strategic plan that will focus on addressing key issues facing the specialty of family medicine. I will unveil the communications program at the first Assembly general session on Oct. 22.

 Family medicine's strategic direction is composed of seven statements. Working together with its health care colleagues and other engaged stakeholders, family medicine aims to achieve the following:

  • Show the value and benefits of primary care.
  • Ensure every person has a personal relationship with a trusted family physician or other primary care health professional in the context of a medical home.
  • Increase the value of primary care.
  • Reduce health care disparities.Lead the continued evolution of the patient-centered medical home.
  • Lead the continued evolution of the patient-centered medical home.
  • Ensure a well-trained primary care workforce.
  • Improve payment for primary care by moving away from fee-for-service and toward comprehensive primary care payment.

The strategic plan is focused on six key implementation areas: practice, payment, workforce education and development, technology, research, and engagement. We are in the process of developing teams that will focus on tactics in each of these six areas. These teams will rely on support and input from a broad network of expertise in family medicine and beyond. Please be on the lookout for ways you can get involved.   

We strongly welcome and encourage your input on this process. We are developing a calendar of events where you can hear directly from, and share your views with, Family Medicine for America's Health leadership about this initiative. We will work to ensure you have a wide variety of in-person and virtual opportunities for engagement. Look for a calendar of events in the next update. We are also in the process of building a website -- FMAHealth.org -- to keep you fully informed on the progress of this effort.

As a reminder, the list below shows the members of the Family Medicine for America’s Health Board of Directors and the organization or other affiliation each represents. We are still working to identify a patient advocate to join the team and expect to have that vacancy filled in time for the launch.

Representative and Organization/Affiliation

  • Glen Stream, M.D., M.B.I., Chair, AAFP
  • Michael Tuggy, M.D., Vice Chair, Association of Family Medicine Residency Directors
  • Paul Martin, D.O., Secretary and Treasurer, American College of Osteopathic Family Physicians
  • Jen Brull, M.D., represents full-scope, full-time practicing family physicians
  • Thomas Campbell, M.D., Association of Departments of Family Medicine
  • Jennifer DeVoe, M.D., D.Phil., North American Primary Care Research Group
  • Lauren Hughes, M.D., M.P.H., represents family physicians early in their careers
  • Vincent Keenan, C.A.E., represents AAFP chapter executives
  • Jerry Kruse, M.D., M.S.P.H., Society of Teachers of Family Medicine
  • Robert Phillips Jr., M.D., M.S.P.H., American Board of Family Medicine
  • Jane Weida, M.D., AAFP Foundation
  • TBD - patient advocate

Additional background and earlier updates on this project are available online

Robert Wergin, M.D., is president-elect of the AAFP.

Wednesday Jun 18, 2014

Implementation Begins on Family Medicine for America's Health

Throughout the year, we have been using this space to provide updates on the Family Medicine for America's Health: Future of Family Medicine 2.0 project. I'm pleased to share that the planning portion of the project is now complete, and we are moving forward with implementation. Our Academy's Board of Directors recently pledged $12 million over the next five years to support implementation of both the strategic and communication plans.

In this latest update, you'll find an announcement of the members serving on the Implementation Committee, the naming of the new chair (former AAFP President Glen Stream, M.D., M.B.I.) and a summary of both the strategic and communication plans. Additional updates will be shared here as the project unfolds. Exciting times for Family Medicine!

Family Medicine for America’s Health: Future of Family Medicine 2.0

Organizational Update No. 7

June 2014

We are pleased to report that the planning phase of the Family Medicine for America’s Health initiative has been completed. As a reminder, the purpose of this effort was to develop a multi-year strategic plan and communications program to address the role of family medicine in the changing health care landscape. To read earlier updates from Family Medicine for America's Health: Future of Family Medicine 2.0, please visit the project Web page.

 The Boards of Directors of each of the seven original sponsoring organizations, plus the American College of Osteopathic Family Physicians (ACOFP), have approved both the strategic and communications plans. The eight organizations have pledged more than $20 million over the next five years to implement both plans, which are described in further detail below.

Moving forward, this effort will be known simply as Family Medicine for America’s Health. An Implementation Committee has been formed that will drive the next phase of this work. Representatives include:

  • Glen Stream, M.D., M.B.I. – Chair (AAFP)
  • Tom Campbell, M.D. (ADFM)
  • Jerry Kruse, M.D., M.S.P.H. (STFM)
  • Paul Martin, D.O. (ACOFP)
  • Norman Oliver, M.D. (NAPCRG)
  • Bob Phillips, M.D. (ABFM)
  • Mike Tuggy, M.D. (AFMRD)
  • Jane Weida, M.D. (AAFP Foundation)

Four additional members are being recruited for the Implementation Committee, representing the following stakeholder categories:

  • Family physician in full-time practice (practice size of five physicians or fewer)
  • Young physician leader in family medicine (five to seven years post-residency)
  • Patient advocate
  • AAFP chapter executive

Strategic Plan

Strategic planning consulting firm CFAR developed the strategy in an intensive eight-month effort that included:

  • A strategy survey (taken by hundreds of family physicians, as well as by other primary care health professionals).
  • Current state analysis of family medicine today and the role family medicine plays in the current health care environment.
  • Identification of scenarios depicting possible futures for family medicine that were tested at a multi-stakeholder retreat attended by family physicians, other primary care health professionals, public and mental health stakeholders, policymakers and employers.

The framework of the strategic plan is organized according to a few guiding principles:

  • Put the patient and family at the center – always.
  • Now is the time for family medicine to take up a leadership role in primary care, including reforming payment in ways that make it possible for family physicians to offer patients and their families the highest quality primary care.
  • Family medicine must clearly state its vision for the next five to seven years and pursue actions specifically linked to strategies in six critical areas: practice, payment, workforce education, technology, research and engagement.
  • Family medicine can’t prove the value of primary care alone. Family medicine leaders must take a leadership role in building partnerships and alliances with a variety of stakeholders in the wider health care system – with patients, other primary care health professions and national policy organizations, among others.

The complete strategic plan will be published in an article in the Annals of Family Medicine later this year.

Communications Plan

Communications consulting firm APCO Worldwide conducted extensive quantitative and qualitative research to develop an evidence-based communications program to demonstrate that family physicians are leaders in the new and evolving health care environment and advocates for patient health. (Detailed findings of the research are provided in earlier editions of the monthly reports.) The plan outlined the following goals:

  • Position family physicians as leaders and central to the delivery of quality care for patients.
  • Increase patient understanding of the value of primary care and of receiving primary care through a family physician.
  • Improve patient engagement in prevention and health care management.
  • Attract the best and brightest students to the practice of family medicine.
  • Shift the payment model to support comprehensive payment reform.

Stakeholder perceptions of family physicians are favorable and higher than those of almost every other medical specialty. With these favorable perceptions come high expectations. The research showed that patients want and need a primary care physician – particularly a family physician – to be at the center of their health care.

A number of concepts and themes were tested for this effort. The winning theme will be launched in October at the AAFP Assembly in Washington, D.C.

This campaign will be used as an advocacy platform to communicate with consumers about their critical role in creating a strong primary care system that improves health. Research examined an exhaustive list of areas where stakeholders believe family medicine must focus. The four focus areas that emerged as most relevant and needed were: prevention and health promotion, health disparities, patient education and engagement, and chronic and complex disease management.

The communications strategy will drive broad, long-term social goals, while strengthening family medicine’s identity, cohesion and capacity to deliver on the triple aim (improving patient care and outcomes and lowering costs). The campaign will use integrated communications and will include policymaker outreach, workplace outreach, paid media, earned media placements, stakeholder engagement, corporate and organizational partnerships, and a strong online presence.

Next Steps

We will continue to provide regular updates on the implementation of this important effort. Watch these reports for opportunities to learn more and weigh in on the process.

Jeff Cain, M.D., is board Chair of the AAFP.

Friday Feb 28, 2014

Future of Family Medicine 2.0 Gathering Information, Insights

Last fall, the Family Medicine Working Party launched an initiative to define the role of the 21st century family physician and ensure that our specialty can deliver the workforce to perform this role. Here is the latest update on the progress of this important project.

Family Medicine for America’s Health: Future of Family Medicine 2.0

Organizational Update No. 6

February 2014

We are entering the final months of the Family Medicine for America’s Health: Future of Family Medicine 2.0 initiative. As a reminder, the purpose of this effort is to develop a multi-year strategic plan and communications program to address the role of family medicine in the changing health care landscape. To read earlier monthly updates from FFM 2.0, please visit the project web page.

In February, the FFM 2.0 Steering Committee and Core Teams held a retreat that included approximately 60 members of the family medicine community and 40 external stakeholders, including payers, patient advocates, employers and providers outside of family medicine. The purpose was to seek a range of perspectives as we narrow in on the strategic commitments of family medicine for the next five to seven years. Although there is still much work to do, our Steering Committee came away energized by two realizations. First, although retreat participants did not always agree on tactics, they are very much in agreement about the need for change to improve health outcomes and lower health care costs in this country. Second, because of the alignment around this purpose, the time is right to explore how family medicine can collaborate with others in the health care ecosystem to bring about the changes in primary care we all seek.

In addition to the stakeholder retreat, we hosted our first of three virtual town hall meetings to hear from practicing family physicians and family medicine educators, and to inform them about the work done to date. More than 225 individuals joined this town hall meeting. The wide-ranging conversation touched on issues related to practice, education and payment for primary care. An archived version of this first town hall meeting is available online.

There will be two additional virtual town hall meetings: 8 p.m. EST on March 5 and 8 p.m. EST on March 26. You can register for the March 5 event by clicking here

Following is an update on the progress and status of the FFM 2.0 project:

Strategic Plan

CFAR, the consulting firm leading the strategic planning process, is now in the process of analyzing the output of the strategy retreat and working with members of the Core Team on a set of recommended strategic commitments. CFAR also will continue to work with the members of the Insight Groups to test the rationale for these strategic commitments and their corresponding tactics. The Insight Groups include medical students, residents and young leaders in family medicine who are in the early years of practice. The Steering Committee then will review the recommended strategic commitments in April.

Communications Plan

APCO Worldwide, which is leading the communications planning, has completed the quantitative research elements of the project. (Please see update No. 5 from January for more information on the results of the opinion survey). APCO has developed broad concepts that define the external understanding of family medicine. These concepts focus on defining family medicine within the context of primary care and demonstrating the overall value of a system based on comprehensive primary care. APCO will test its concepts in a series of focus groups. Once themes and messages are defined, APCO will develop a comprehensive communications plan aimed at reaching two key audiences: consumers and policymakers/influencers.

Seeking Your Input

Your feedback is critical to this process. We welcome and encourage your comments and questions and have a dedicated email address for input. Since our first report on this initiative, we have received hundreds of comments to this address -- all have been very valuable to the Steering Committee and Core Team.

Please continue sharing your thoughts at futurefm@aafp.org.

Jeff Cain, M.D., is Board Chair of the AAFP.

Wednesday Dec 18, 2013

Future of Family Medicine 2.0: What's Your Opinion?

It's time for another update on Family Medicine for America's Health: Future of Family Medicine 2.0. In addition to providing you with details of the latest actions related to this important project, the update below offers family physicians an opportunity to provide input on four specific questions related to payment models, family physician training, research and the triple aim (improving patient care and outcomes and lowering costs).

You can address the questions below -- and offer other thoughts on the project -- at FutureFM@aafp.org.

Family Medicine for America’s Health: Future of Family Medicine 2.0

Organizational Update No. 4

Dec. 17, 2013

This is the fourth update of the Family Medicine for America’s Health: Future of Family Medicine 2.0 initiative. The goal of this effort, which was launched in late August, is to develop a multiyear strategic plan and communications program to address the role of family medicine in the changing health care landscape.

      As a reminder, the Family Medicine Working Party identified a set of key principles that will underpin this effort:

  • Deliver on the triple aim: improving the health of the population; enhancing the patient experience of care (including quality, access, and reliability); and reducing, or at least controlling, the per-capita cost of care.
  • Focus on the needs of residents and medical students, as well as practicing family physicians.
  • Manage the tension between addressing the needs of family medicine as a specialty and needed changes to the health care system of which it is a part.

Strategic Plan

CFAR, the strategic consulting firm hired for this project, is now working on its "current state" analysis. This document is designed to create a shared understanding about where the profession is today. This shared understanding serves as a foundation on which to build an implementable strategic plan that identifies risks to take, investments required to do so, and a realistic understanding of how to bridge the gap between the current state and the desired future we want to create. Following are the key issues that are being examined as part of this process:

  • Core attributes: What are the core attributes of family medicine today, and what do they need to be in the future, for our profession to achieve the triple aim in the service of our patients and the larger health care landscape?
  • Evolving ecosystem: How should family medicine change in response to the challenges of an evolving health care system to best meet the needs of the nation?
  • Education: What changes are needed in the continuum of education (from medical school through residency and into CME) to train the family physicians needed in the new health care system?
  • Communicating value: How do we best communicate to relevant stakeholders the value and benefits of family medicine and the important role family physicians play in meeting the health care needs of the U.S. population?

CFAR has sought broad input from family physicians -- and those who work alongside them -- in the development of the current state analysis. This has included

  • conducting in-depth interviews with thought leaders and stakeholders in the field of family medicine; and
  • conducting a strategic options survey designed to test the assumptions the community holds about the present, as well as perspectives on strategic choices in the future. The survey was sent to more than 6,000 front-line family physicians, as well as a variety of other primary care health professionals, such as OB/Gyns, general internists, nurse practitioners and physician assistants and physicians early in their careers.

     We encourage feedback and would welcome input from family physicians through our dedicated email address FutureFM@aafp.org on the following questions:

  • Can you share any examples of family physicians -- yourself included -- who are working in payment environments other than fee-for-service? How has that experience affected their practice (or your own)?
  • What are some concrete steps family medicine can take to increase the number of family physicians trained to meet the needs of the American public in the future?
  • How can the leadership of family medicine help family physicians meet the demands of the triple aim (improved patient care, improved health of populations, lower cost)?
  • What kinds of research would help improve your practice?

Communications Platform

      APCO Worldwide, the communications consulting firm, is conducting research to develop the communications platform to reflect the strategic plan. APCO has conducted in-depth interviews to elicit attitudes and opinions about family medicine from external audiences including policymakers, major insurers, employees and purchasers and other primary care health professionals. These interviews focused on perceptions of family physicians, the role of family physicians in the new health care era and the future of family medicine. Following is a brief summary of the findings:

  • There is marked appreciation for the skills and patient rapport that family physicians bring to health care.
  • Family physicians are viewed as having a solid diagnostic ability based on their scope of medical and clinical knowledge.
  • Treating the entire family gives family physicians an advantage compared with other primary care physicians in being able to consider social and behavioral dynamics in their diagnosis and treatment.
  • Expertise in prevention and education helps position family physicians for the new health care landscape.
  • Family physicians are seen as the natural choice to lead the patient-centered medical home and accountable care organizations, coordinating care and stressing wellness.
  • There is a strong belief that new comprehensive care models provide family physicians the greatest opportunity to succeed in the new system.
  • Retail clinics are seen as the greatest threat to the family physician.
  • Most cannot imagine a health care system without family physicians.

APCO currently is conducting the quantitative research element of the communications planning process. The results of its broad public opinion survey will be presented in January.

We strongly encourage you to share your input. Again, you can provide feedback at FutureFM@aafp.org. We welcome comments on the items outlined above or other suggestions/insights that would be useful to this process.

Upcoming Meetings

The fifth meeting of the Core Team will be Jan. 9. The next combined meeting of the Working Party, Steering Committee and Core Team will be Jan. 16-18.

Jeff Cain, M.D., is Board Chair of the AAFP.

Wednesday Dec 04, 2013

Students, Young Physicians Provide Insights for Future of Family Medicine 2.0

Have you offered your opinion on the Future of Family Medicine?

Your opinion matters, and now is the time.

In our first update on Family Medicine for America's Health: Future of Family Medicine 2.0, you had a chance to learn about our initiative that aims to define the role of the 21st century family physician, including scope of practice and our role within the health care system.

In our December update below, we address some of the important questions being considered by the work group and introduce you to the young physicians, residents and medical students who have been selected to help answer those questions.

You can share your thoughts directly with us at FutureFM@AAFP.org. And you can be sure we will continue to share updates on our progress.

Family Medicine for America's Health

(Future of Family Medicine 2.0)

December 2013

The Family Medicine for America's Health (Future of Family Medicine 2.0) initiative is moving forward according to schedule. The purpose of this effort is to develop a multiyear strategic plan and communications program to address the role of family medicine in the changing health care landscape. 

      The Core Team held two meetings in November. The meetings focused on CFAR's "current state" analysis and APCO's opinion research. The current state analysis is designed to create a foundation on which to build an implementable strategic plan that identifies risks to take, investments required to do so, and a realistic understanding of what it will take to bridge the gap between the current state and the desired future we want to create. During the meetings, there has been significant discussion about scope of practice, compensation and the impact of technology on the specialty. 

To address some of the key questions and ensure broad input in the process, the CFAR team is focused on organizing two “Insight Groups” designed to engage and elicit feedback on the future of family medicine. The first group includes medical students and residents. The second group includes young leaders who are in their early years of practice. Each of the seven family medicine organizations nominated two participants to each of the groups. Please see below for names of the 28 individuals who were nominated.

Discussions with these Insight Groups are being facilitated by Dr. Bob Graham, Dr. Larry Green, and Dr. Jim Martin. Members will contribute their perspective throughout the FFM 2.0 process. This will include

  • participating in discussions about the future of family medicine with their facilitators;
  • reviewing and reacting to the work produced by the Core Team and the Steering Committee; and
  • meeting in person with the Core Team, Steering Committee, and a variety of stakeholders within and outside of family medicine at a strategic planning retreat in February. 

APCO, which is leading the communications strategy element of the project, has completed a series of in-depth interviews with policy experts, payers, employers and specialists outside of family medicine. APCO's interviews will inform the quantitative element of their research, which includes a survey of a wide group of family medicine stakeholders. The results of that survey are expected in January.

We strongly encourage input from family physicians. Since our first report on this initiative, we have received more than 100 comments to FutureFM@aafp.org.

      Following are several of the key questions the Core Team is considering as CFAR develops the current state analysis. We welcome input on these questions or general comments via FutureFM@AAFP.org.

  • Is the patient-centered medical home (PCMH) the model of the future?
  • How will the PCMH model need to evolve to meet the demands of the Triple Aim?
  • Is population health a key part of family medicine? How should family medicine integrate with public health?
  • How will disruptive technology alter the practice of family medicine?
  • What changes are needed in the current payment structure to support the future of family medicine?
  • What data is available/needed to support changes in payment structure?
  • How does a narrowing scope in maternity and children's care impact the practice of family medicine?

The Core Team and Steering Committee will meet on Dec. 8. We will continue to provide monthly updates throughout this process.

Insight Group Members

Young Leaders (with nominating organizations)

  • Michael Coffey, M.D., Somerville, Mass. (AAFP)
  • Christina Kelly, M.D., Harker Heights, Texas (AAFP)
  • Brooke Sciuto, M.D., Sacramento, Calif. (AAFP Foundation)
  • Gretchen Dickson, M.D., M.B.A., Wichita, Kan. (AAFP Foundation)
  • Kurt Lindberg, M.D., Holland, Mich. (ABFM)
  • Amy McIntyre, M.D., M.P.H., Butte, Mont. (ABFM)
  • Melissa Nothnagle, M.D., M.Sc., Pawtucket, R.I. (ADFM)
  • Jill Endres, M.D., Iowa City, Iowa (ADFM)
  • Carl Covey, M.D., Las Vegas (AFMRD)
  • Carla Ainsworth, M.D., M.P.H., Seattle (AFMRD)
  • Lauren Hughes, M.D., M.P.H., Ann Arbor, Mich. (NAPCRG)
  • Rebecca Etz, Ph.D., Richmond, Va. (NAPCRG)
  • Alisahah Cole, M.D., Charlotte, N.C. (STFM)
  • Brett White, M.D., San Diego (STFM)

     Students and Residents (with nominating organizations)

  • Tate Hinkle, Brownsboro, Ala. (AAFP)
  • Kimberly Becher, M.D. (AAFP)
  • Nathaniel Lepp, M.P.H. (AAFP Foundation)
  • Jessica Johnson, M.D., Portland, Ore. (AAFP Foundation)
  • Charles Salmen, Brisbane, Calif. (ABFM)
  • Kathleen Barnes, M.D., M.P.H. (ABFM)
  • Jason Valadao, Wauwatosa, Wis. (ADFM)
  • Jillian Fickenscher, M.D., Omaha, Neb. (ADFM)
  • Natasha Bhuyan, M.D., Phoenix (AFMRD)
  • Kari Sears, M.D., South Bend, Ind. (AFMRD)
  • Vanessa Stagliano, Sagamore Hills, Ohio (NAPCRG)
  • Richard Bruno, M.D., Baltimore (NAPCRG)
  • Rebecca Mullen, Overland Park, Kan. (STFM)
  • Nicholas Cohen, M.D., Cleveland (STFM)

Jeff Cain, M.D., is Board Chair of the AAFP.

Tuesday Oct 29, 2013

Shaping the Future of Family Medicine

A few months ago, the Family Medicine Working Party launched an initiative to examine the challenges and opportunities facing our specialty and define a path forward in a rapidly changing health care system.

Family Medicine for America's Health: Future of Family Medicine 2.0 is specifically designed to define the role of the 21st century family physician, including key attributes, practice scope and role within the health care system, and to ensure family medicine can deliver the workforce to perform this role via medical school/residency training and re-engaging existing family physicians, among other things.

When this project launched, we promised to share regular updates on its progress. Here is the latest information.

Family Medicine for America’s Health: Future of Family Medicine 2.0

Organizational Update #2

October 2013

As many of you know, the Family Medicine for America’s Health: Future of Family Medicine 2.0 initiative launched in late August. The purpose of this effort is to develop a multiyear strategic plan and communications program to address the role of family medicine in the changing health care landscape.

      As a reminder, the Family Medicine Working Party identified a set of key principles that will underpin this effort: 

  • deliver on the triple aim: improving the health of the population, enhancing the patient experience of care (including quality, access and reliability), and reducing, or at least controlling, the per capita cost of care;
  • focus on the needs of residents and medical students, as well as practicing family physicians; and
  • manage the tension between addressing the needs of family medicine as a specialty and needed changes to the health care system of which it is a part.

The first of seven Core Team meetings was held on Oct. 15 in Chicago. The consultants retained for this project -- CFAR and APCO Worldwide -- have begun the research phases of their respective plans. CFAR conducted a series of interviews with family medicine stakeholders. Interviewees included family physicians practicing and teaching in a variety of settings, public health and mental health teachers and practitioners, osteopaths, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, and other specialists. The insights gleaned from the interviews will be used to inform CFAR's Strategic Options Survey, which launched during the week of Oct. 21 and will remain open for two weeks. CFAR also will begin gathering and working with data from a range of sources to build a solid understanding of the current state of family medicine, its strengths and its challenges.

APCO is conducting in-depth interviews with health policy experts, payers, health plan purchasers, other primary care professionals and specialists to gather insights and recommendations related to how these external stakeholders view family physicians. These discussions will inform the quantitative element of their research, which includes surveys of a wide group of family medicine stakeholders. This research will be used to guide the development of a comprehensive communications plan.

At the meeting, CFAR and APCO briefed the Core Team on feedback from their interviews. Issues surrounding scope of practice and length of training emerged as significant themes, particularly in the CFAR interviews. Additional questions arose from both CFAR and APCO's discussions that will require further discussion and evaluation, including

  • Are family physicians “specialists” or “comprehensivists” who provide longitudinal care?
  • What is the “unifying theme” among the diverse archetypes of family physicians?
  • How do family physicians approach the needs and wants of patients differently than do other physicians?
  • Do family physicians believe they have a mandate to lead the patient-centered medical home effort or are they deferring to others?
  • What impact will technology and big data have on the practice of family medicine?

Since our first report to members on this initiative, we have received more than 140 comments to FutureFM@aafp.org. We are pleased that family physicians are taking the time to provide input and would encourage others to share their views through this dedicated e-mail address. We are closely reviewing comments and are incorporating suggestions into the planning process.

The second meeting of the Core Team will be Nov. 13. We will continue to provide updates throughout this process. We strongly encourage input and feedback and invite you to share your thoughts and recommendations by email to FutureFM@aafp.org.

Following are members of the Steering Committee and the Core Team.

Steering Committee

Samuel Jones, M.D. (ABFM) -- Committee Chair

Stacy Brungardt (STFM)

Ardis Davis (ADFM)

Frank deGruy, M.D. (NAPCRG)

Kevin Helm (AFMRD)

Douglas Henley, M.D. (AAFP)

Grant Hoekzema, M.D. (AFMRD)

Jason Marker, M.D. (AAFP Foundation)

James Puffer, M.D. (ABFM)

John Saultz, M.D. (STFM)

Kurt Stange, M.D., Ph.D. (NAPCRG)

Glen Stream, M.D., M.B.I. (AAFP)

Barbara Thompson, M.D. (ADFM)

Jane Weida, M.D. (AAFP Foundation)

Core Team

Tom Campbell (ADFM)

Jennifer DeVoe, M.D., D.Phil. (NAPCRG)

Jerry Kruse, M.D. (STFM)

Bob Phillips, M.D. (ABFM)

Glen Stream, M.D., M.B.I. (AAFP)

Mike Tuggy, M.D. (AFMRD)

Mary Jo Welker, M.D. (AAFP Foundation)

Jeff Cain, M.D.is Board Chair of the AAFP.

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