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Monday Mar 31, 2014

Visit to Army Medical Center Provides Insight Into Military Care

Recently, I had the good fortune to tour Brooke Army Medical Center (BAMC) Fort Sam Houston in San Antonio, and I came away extremely impressed by the great job that the Army does in caring for our soldiers on multiple levels: keeping healthy soldiers healthy, treating the acutely injured and helping the injured recover.

I also was impressed by the many opportunities available for family physicians to serve in military medicine. And it would be hard not to be awed by the largest inpatient medical facility run by the Department of Defense.

I recently toured Brooke Army Medical Center Fort Sam Houston in San Antonio with Col. Karrie Fristoe, commander of the U.S. Army's Medical Recruiting Brigade, and Rebecca Hooper, Ph.D., retired Col., and former assistant director of BAMC's Center for the Intrepid.

But to me, even more impressive was the commitment to improving the overall health of our soldiers and our country. One of our hosts, Lt. Gen. Patricia Horoho, U.S. Army surgeon general, stressed the importance of both the patient-centered medical home and efforts to emphasize health, not just treating illness and injuries. The Army Medicine Performance Triad -- eating well, being active and sleeping well -- are guides for soldiers to lead a better life with more engagement, energy and fulfillment.

The 2.1 million-square-foot, 425-bed San Antonio Military Medical Center has a certified Level 1 Trauma Center that handles more than 5,700 ER visits per month, yet it also offers primary care, pediatrics, OB/Gyn, bone marrow transplants, a cardiac catheterization lab and psychiatric care to service members, their families, veterans and civilians.

BAMC is home to the Army Burn Center, part of the Army Institute of Surgical Research. We were able to see how the Burn Center has the ability to project ICU level burn care anywhere in the world, to bring injured soldiers home in a mobile ICU, and treat them all the way through rehab and recovery.

It also is the site of the Center for the Intrepid (CFI), a world class facility for service members recovering from amputation. Here you can really see the benefit of combining the complete range of state-of-the-art amputee treatment in one facility: prosthetists, psychologists, challenging sports equipment and even virtual reality systems with one aim: bringing wounded warriors back to the highest level of functioning possible. The CFI and their athletes are inspiring, and the facility is far beyond anything offered in the civilian world.

Most family physicians likely know that the Armed Forces Health Professionals Scholarships Program (HPSP) offers full scholarships for medical school, but during my visit, I was struck by the wide number of opportunities available to family physicians practicing in the military. Indeed, by the age of 42 one of my hosts, Lt. Col. Tom Hustead, M.D., family physician and AAFP member, has already served as a clinic director, a flight surgeon, and a department chair in family medicine. In addition, he has been deployed in a military service area.

Hustead said many of the more than 550 Army family physicians, like him, initially joined out of a desire to serve our country, but they remain for the camaraderie and opportunity found in the in Army Medical Corps.

There are nearly 2,000 active AAFP members in our Uniformed Services chapter.

My message today is for them: Thank you for your service.

Jeff Cain, M.D., is Board Chair of the AAFP.

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The opinions and views expressed here are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent or reflect the opinions and views of the American Academy of Family Physicians. This blog is not intended to provide medical, financial, or legal advice. All comments are moderated and will be removed if they violate our Terms of Use.