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Wednesday Aug 20, 2014

When It Comes to Mentoring, Both Giving and Receiving Are Important

Many mentors helped guide and direct me to medicine, in general, and to family medicine, specifically. There are too many to name here, but there was always someone to help me when I reached the next transition point. From high school to college and through medical school and residency, I could list a steady stream of physicians who were there to offer support, guidance and teaching along the way.  

I truly valued these relationships and took to heart the importance of mentoring. Along my path, I have made a point of reaching back to offer the same guidance to others that was given to me. I treasure being a mentor, continue to learn from the students I teach, and I can't wait to see what they will do in their own careers.

Here I am with AAFP President Reid Blackwelder, M.D. It's important to have a more experienced physician we can turn to for guidance even after we've transitioned from resident to new physician.

I was satisfied with my own transition from mentee to mentor -- or at least I thought I was -- until I had a recent conversation with my husband.

My husband, an administrator in education, had been contemplating a position change. During the application process, he mentioned several mentors that he was turning to for strategic advice. After he accepted the position, he was promptly paired with a new mentor to help guide his professional development.

When I contemplated my own position change, I looked around and, for the first time in my career, saw no one there to help me. My first few years out of residency had been spent at a community health center with several seasoned doctors, one of whom was a mentor and had been faculty at my residency program. Those more senior physicians provided a great bridge to the real world.

However, at my current job, I'm the doctor who has been in primary care practice the longest, despite the fact that I'm only in my seventh year out of residency. I'm also the only family physician.  

Although I know the mentors I have called on in the past would still answer my call, it is easy to get caught up in the daily grind and not have time to reach out. Unlike residency, where there is always an attending around the corner, there are fewer people above us to help guide us after we move into our own leadership roles.  

New physicians are pulled in many different directions, and those who have families and/or are relocating may find it especially difficult to take time to reach out to other doctors and potential mentors. Doctors in small and single physician practices, as well as those in rural areas, are also at risk of feeling like they have to go it alone.

My recent state chapter meeting, however, reminded me that we are not alone. While there, I had the opportunity to discuss my career goals and aspirations with AAFP President Reid Blackwelder, M.D., of Kingsport, Tenn., whom I also now call a mentor. In addition, the meeting provided a chance to reconnect with friends and colleagues and swap stories and experiences. State chapters have a wonderful opportunity to bring family physicians of all different career experiences together, and that can facilitate these types of exchanges between new physicians and our more seasoned colleagues.

The chapter meeting's educational program was appreciated, but what really will stick with me is having that opportunity to reconnect with peers and learn from those more experienced than I am. I can't wait to do it on a grander scale at the AAFP Assembly in October. I hope to see you there.

Kisha Davis, M.D., M.P.H., is the new physician member of the AAFP Board of Directors.

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The opinions and views expressed here are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent or reflect the opinions and views of the American Academy of Family Physicians. This blog is not intended to provide medical, financial, or legal advice. All comments are moderated and will be removed if they violate our Terms of Use.